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Copyright, All Rights Reserved. All content on this site is copyrighted, Dana Worley, as of the date of posting. Reuse or redistribution of this content is strictly prohibited without express written permission of the author.

Friday, May 6, 2016

Fused Glass Fern Platter

Fused glass fern platter, Dana Worley
Fused glass fern platter, Dana Worley


Several months ago I made a fused glass fern platter. I had almost forgotten that I took pictures along the way, with the intent of creating a short tutorial. So without further delay, this post shows how I used Creative Paradise's Fern texture tile to create a hand-painted (yet simple) platter with a lot of appeal.




Supplies

Unique Glass Color NT Paints: Leaf green, dark green, and warm brown
Powdered frit: Clear, yellow, and dark green
Two 12 1/4 x 6 7/8" sheets of clear glass
DT11 Fern Tile (Creative Paradise)
GM85 mold (Creative Paradise)

Directions

Use the texture tile as a guide for applying paints
Use the texture tile as a guide for applying paints
Place the texture tile on your work surface, and then place one sheet of the clear glass on top of the tile. Using the texture tile as your guide, begin by painting the stem of the ferns with the warm brown Unique Glass Color paint (mixed as directed by UGC). Continue by painting some of the fern fronds with the dark green UGC paint, followed by painting the remaining fronds and the fiddleheads with the leaf green paint. Set aside to dry.


Set aside painted tile to dry
Set aside painted tile to dry


Close-up of painted fronds
Close-up of painted fronds



 







Use the texture tile again as a guide for powders
Use the texture tile again as a guide for powders

Place the second sheet of clear on top of the texture tile. Notice that I've put paper down on my work surface. I like to do this when working with powders so that I can more easily clean up (and recapture) any powder that doesn't end up on the glass.

Remember! Always wear a proper respirator when working with and cleaning up glass powders.

Use green powder as a background color for the fronds
Use green powder as a background color for the fronds


Use a sifter filled half-way with green powder to cover the areas where the ferns will be to provide a background for them. You can use a commercial sifter made for powders, but an individual serving-sized tea ball with a handle works great.








Be mindful of reactions when applying the yellow powder
Be mindful of reactions when applying the yellow powder
Cover the areas of the background with the yellow powder. Keep in mind the potential reactions that can occur when laying down the powders. Greens typically contain copper and yellows contain sulfur. You can potentially end up with a dark color you don't want where the two colors touch, especially if you put down heavy layers of opal powder. If you look closely at the picture, I've used clear powder to act as a barrier between the two colors to avoid these reactions. 




Layup: Texture tile, clear sheet with powder & painted clear
Layup: Texture tile, clear sheet with powder & painted clear

Place the clear glass with the painted ferns on top of the powder-covered clear base, which is on top of the texture tile, and you are ready to fire.

I quite often fire my texture tiles with a large mixed load of other fused glass pieces, though this kiln load was mostly filled with texture tiles. Following is the schedule that I used, which accommodated all of the pieces in the firing.


In the kiln and ready to fire
In the kiln and ready to fire

Seg
Rate
Target
Soak
1
300
1100
30
2
50
1250
60
3
500
1460
15
4
1500
950
90
5
100
700
00















After the first firing, I slumped the piece in Creative Paradise's GM85 Large Rectangular sushi mold. Check out the bottom of this post for additional pictures of the platter.

I hope this short tutorial has inspired you to consider how you can use a few simple supplies and texture tiles to create beautiful fused glass pieces.

Happy Fusing! 
Dana

Resources

Bullseye Kiln-glass Education Online

Fused glass fern platter
Fused glass fern platter

Close-up, completed fern platter
Close-up, completed fern platter




3 comments:

  1. this is great Dana Thank you so much!!!

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  2. Is there a schedule for broken glass to be 'fused and slumped' in the same firing right in the mold?

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    Replies
    1. Hello Lindi, if you are talking about this particular texture tile, I think it might not give the results you hope for. I'm sure any full-fused schedule would get you started in the right direction, but you would have to be careful about going hot enough to fuse the glass without the glass flowing over the sides. At the very least, you would want to dam the project. Best, Dana

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