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Copyright, All Rights Reserved. All content on this site is copyrighted, Dana Worley, as of the date of posting. Reuse or redistribution of this content is strictly prohibited without express written permission of the author.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Fused Glass Koi Platter

Close-up of painted koi
Close-up of painted koi
Recently I created a koi platter using paints from Unique Glass Color (UGC) and a Creative Paradise texture tile. I planned to create a short tutorial, so I took pictures of the process along the way. Today I received a few questions about the process, so it's time to write a blog post!

The koi texture tile is 13x7". I often cut the glass for this size of tile ~6 x 12", so that I don't have to worry about the glass migrating over the edges (which will break the glass and potentially damage the tile). That's really not a concern with this piece, but it can be a concern if you add a lot of frit or larger pieces of glass that increase the overall volume of the glass.

Lightly penciled registration marks.
Lightly penciled registration marks.

Painting

For this piece I wanted all of my color to come from the UGC paints, so I used clear glass for both the top and bottom layers. I placed my glass pieces, one at a time, on top of the texture tile and used the tile as a guide for where to apply the paint. Note: I use System 96 glass.

With a pencil, I put registration marks on the tile so when I removed the glass I could replace it back in the correct spot.

Water background. Bottom layer of glass.
Water background.
Bottom layer of glass.




For the water background, I applied Unique Glass Colors NT paints and Artisan paints on the bottom layer of glass. The Artisan paints produce lovely bubbles when fired between two layers of glass.






Koi fish. Top layer of glass.
Koi fish.
Top layer of glass.

The koi fish were painted on the top layer of glass. The white paint is an NT called White Diamond, which when fired, produces a lovely white shimmer.

After painting the fish on the top side, I filled in some bare spots on the back side with the White Diamond.





Glass pieces placed on texture tile.
Glass pieces placed on texture tile.



Once the paint was dry, I placed the two pieces of glass on top of the texture tile, using the registration marks as a guide.






Firing 

Many people prefuse the layers and then fire the resulting piece a second time on the texture tile. I always fuse my layers of glass directly on the texture tile. Below is the schedule I used. Note the slow ramp in Segment two, up to 1250 deg F with a 60 minute hold. This is the bubble squeeze. If I were firing this piece by itself, I might consider omitting this segment since I was using bubble paints and, well, bubbles were desirable in this piece!
In the kiln, ready to fire.
In the kiln, ready to fire.

Seg
Rate
Target
Soak
1
300
1100
30
2
50
1250
60
3
500
1460
15
4
1500
950
90
5
100
700
00

After the first firing, I slumped the piece in an 11.5 inch Origami Bowl Mold from Slumpys (I no longer see this particular mold on their site, but here is a link to the mold on Amazon).
Origami Bowl Mold for slump.
Origami Bowl Mold for slump.

Note that this is a square mold, but I'm firing a rectangle. I centered the glass within the mold and fired away! Here is the firing schedule for the slump:
Ready to slump. The rectangular koi platter was  centered on top of the square mold and fired.
Ready to slump. The rectangular koi platter was
centered on top of the square mold and fired. 

Seg
Rate
Target
Soak
1
200
1100
40
2
300
1225
10
3
1500
950
120
4
100
700
00








Finished koi platter.
Finished koi platter. 

The platter sits nicely on the table. No cold working needed!
The platter sits nicely on the table. No cold working needed!


 And finally, here are some pictures of the finished piece. The origami mold worked out well with the koi design.

This platter sold at the art fair I attended a few weeks later.






I hope this short tutorial has been useful, and helps you with your work with texture tiles and paints. Don't forget to visit the Creative Paradise web site for this and many other texture tiles, and the UGC web site for your paints!

Happy fusing,  Dana
Close-up of the painted koi water. Bubbles and sparkle!
Close-up of the painted koi and water.
Bubbles and sparkle!




















Resources:
Creative Paradise's web site for texture tiles and other molds: http://www.creativeparadiseglass.com/
Unique Glass Color Paints: http://uniqueglasscolors.com/

Want to learn more about fusing? Visit Bullseye Glass's site for Educational Videos! (available for a small subscription fee). Click on the banner to learn more:
Bullseye Kiln-glass Education Online

7 comments:

  1. Thank you Dana for sharing, very nice work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome! I hope you found it useful. Dana

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  2. Hi Dana, just one question on the firing schedule. You left in the bubble squeeze segment when you used the bubble paint and still got those amazing bubbles, correct? I have this mold and just ordered some of the paints to play with. Thanks for sharing this wonderful technique! Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jan, Thanks for asking your question -- it's something I have wondered about. I just checked with Margo Clark, who is one of the owners of Unique Glass Colors... She said because the bubbles are achieved with a chemical reaction, a bubble squeeze will not affect the creation of bubbles. I had never experienced any problems, but I thought I would double-check with her before I answered, so I would not give you bad info! :)

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    2. thanks for checking!!! I assumed you had left the squeeze in the schedule and your bubbles turned out great. Can't wait to try this :-)

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  3. So you didn't fire either layer before putting them together to fire on texture tile? Gotta try this - I have had the tile for months - made one piece and reverse painted it with "to-bake" acrylics. Looks okay, but I would rather use permanent fired-on enamels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ted, I know a lot of people advocate fusing the two layers and then fusing again on the texture tile. However, I have never experienced problems fusing it all at once (of course, I may have just jinxed myself!).

      Delete