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Copyright, All Rights Reserved. All content on this site is copyrighted, Dana Worley, as of the date of posting. Reuse or redistribution of this content is strictly prohibited without express written permission of the author.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Inspired! Irid Dragonfly Intention Plaque

Iridescent dragonfly intention plaque
Iridescent dragonfly intention plaque
While at the Glass Craft and Bead Expo this past spring, I stopped by the booth of Jubilee Creative and picked up some word decals. I don't normally work with a lot of decals, but I had an idea in mind for what I wanted to call "intention plaques" (or affirmation plaques), and since my handwriting leans toward illegible at times, I thought decals would work well.

I created several of these plaques. First, I prefused the words on 1x2" squares of white or cream. Then I shuffled the words, picked one at random, and tried to create a piece that reflected the word. It was a fun challenge, and hopefully a boost to my creativity!

While doing this, I also happened to watch a video from the Bullseye Glass Education collection showing a technique for using clear powder on iridescent glass to create images in the glass. I decided to try out this technique on one of the intention plaques, along with another fun thing I saw in a demo at the Inspirational Metal Art booth while at the expo -- using alcohol inks to color aluminum cut outs (which were purchased at the booth).

So... new techniques and supplies in hand, I set to work. I used the aluminum dragonfly cut out as my stencil for applying the clear powder to the irid glass (see the video for full info). I did not apply the irid evenly across the glass as they did in the video, because I wanted a gradient irid effect. I then placed the prefused word on the irid, and placed the irid on top of a blank of clear with a couple of "U's" of high temp wire sandwiched in between so I would have some way to later hang the glass. I followed a typical full-fuse schedule for System 96 glass.

The technique for applying the alcohol inks to the aluminum is fairly complicated. You drip it on in various random patterns . If you don't like the effect, just rinse it off and try again! Once I was satisfied with the design, I set it aside to dry. Once dry, I set the ink with some Krylon clear matte sealant (found at any store where you can get spray paint -- local hardware, Walmart, Home Depot, Lowes, etc.). Rustoleum brand makes a version, too. The clear matte coating ensures the inks are colorfast.
View slightly angled to better show the shadow image
View slightly angled to better
show the shadow image.
The word for this plaque
is Inspire.

I placed the decorated metal cut out somewhat offset from the image on the glass to provide a shadow-image effect. The cut out was glued to a narrow strip of 1/4" glass just a bit thinner than the body to act as a stand-off, and that was glued to the fused glass (I used E6000 glue).

I really like how this piece turned out. It's always satisfying when a few simple design techniques turn into a striking fused glass creation!

Side view, showing stand-off
Side view, showing stand-off

Happy fusing!


Dana




Resources:
Jubilee Creative
Inspirational Metal Art
Bullseye Educational Video: Clear Powder on Iridescent Sheet  Glass

Learn more about Bullseye Glass Educational Videos!
Bullseye Kiln-glass Education Online

2 comments:

  1. Love your dragon - and now another thing to add to the gotta do list - alcohol inks. Just to clarify, you are dusting with clear powder glass over the irid glass to get your image?

    I enjoy reading your blog and how you do things and try going further out of the box. Bridget

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Notice that the shadow image is the same as the cut out -- that is where the clear powder *was not*. Check out the Bullseye tutorial.

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